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Sonoita-Elgin Fire District

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The latest information on Fire Restrictions.....

NEWS RELEASE
wildlandfire.az.gov
Contact: Southwest Fire Restrictions Hotline 1-877-864-6985

Arrival of Monsoon Signals Easing of Fire Restrictions in Southeast Arizona

Tucson, Ariz. (July 11, 2018) --- Effective Friday, July 13 at 8 a.m., the Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management, Bureau of Land Management Gila District, all districts of the Coronado National Forest, Saguaro National Park, Casa Grande Ruins National Monument, Coronado National Memorial, Chiricahua National Monument, Fort Bowie National Historic Site, Tumacácori National Historical Park, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, and the San Bernardino, Leslie Canyon and Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuges will lift all fire restrictions in southeastern Arizona. Due to widespread precipitation across the area, additional rain in the weather forecast, and a rise in fuel moistures, it has been determined that the likelihood of wildfire has lessened to the degree that the restrictions can be rescinded.

Visitors are reminded to always practice fire safety.

• Before going hiking or camping, check with public land management agencies for fire regulations, restrictions or area closures.

• Metal fire rings or grills should be used where present. Wood placed on a fire should never exceed the size of the grill or fire ring.

• If building a fire on the ground (in areas where permitted), a location should be selected which is away from adjoining or overhanging flammable material, and the ground beneath and around the fire should be cleared of all flammable materials. On windy days fires should be avoided if possible.

• If you have a campfire, make sure it is fully extinguished before leaving the area. Fires should be doused with water and dirt and stirred with a shovel until completely cold to the touch.

• If you are using a portable stove, make sure the area is clear of grasses and other fine fuels. Prevent stoves from tipping and starting a fire.

• Cigarettes should never be thrown out the window of a vehicle. Instead, ashtrays should be used in order to prevent wildfires.

• Practice Leave No Trace principles - pack out cigarette butts and burned materials from your camping area.

• Never park a vehicle over dead grass; the catalytic converter can ignite the vegetation.

• Use caution while discharging a firearm, operating an internal combustion engine, welding, or operating acetylene or other torches with an open flame, or using explosives (where permitted).

• Fireworks are always prohibited on state and federal lands.

Fire conditions as well as localized closures and restrictions are subject to change. Because tribal, federal, state, and local mandates are different, they may have some differences in their year-round regulations and restriction notices. For a more detailed explanation concerning agency restrictions and fire information in general, please contact the nearest land management agency office where you plan to work or play, visit wildlandfire.az.gov or call the toll-free Southwest Fire Restrictions Hotline at 1-877-864-6985.
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Fuels Reduction Burn....

SEFD will be conducting a fuels reduction burn in the vicinity of Yucca Ash Farm Road this morning. You may see smoke for a few hours. 🙂
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Fuels Reduction Burn....

SEFD will be conducting a fuels reduction burn at Casas Arroyos this morning beginning around 0815 lasting for several hours. You maysee smoke throughout the morning.
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New start on the Cienega north of Hwy 82...estimating 20 acres... as seen from our backyard ... See MoreSee Less

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), sickness from the heat occurs when your body cannot compensate and properly cool you off. However, heat-related illness and death are preventable.

Before the next heat wave, or outdoor activity, follow these protective actions from the CDC and stay cool this summer:

Stay in an air-conditioned location as much as possible.

Drink plenty of fluids, even if you do not feel thirsty.

Take several breaks from the heat, especially midday when the sun is hottest.

Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing, and sunscreen.

Remember that you should reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.

Take cool showers or baths to cool down.

Check on friends or neighbors during extremely hot days and have someone do the same for you.

Never leave children or pets in cars.
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Fire/EMS Stats

2018

APRIL

MVC 3
Medical 22
Wildfire 4
Structure Fire 0
Vehicle Fire 0
Public Assist 2
Burn Permit 0
Hazmat 1
TOTAL 32

Sonoita-Elgin Fire Season – 2017

Over the past few months the Sonoita-Elgin area has been experiencing a lot of wind-driven wildfires, some small and some large. There have been a few questions asked about tactics used to fight the fires…this is not an easy question to answer in print. First, I would like to state the Sonoita-Elgin Fire is a suppression Department; our objectives are to protect lives, structures, and grasslands.
Sonoita-Elgin (& SEESI) has, for the past few decades, used an Anchor and Flank Method. This is where we start at the heel of the fire (the origin) and flank both sides of the fire, suppressing the fire as we move toward the head. This is the most effective method on most fires. If you approach a fire from the head you still have two active flanks coming up the sides, this in turn will leave you with two fires heading in two different directions. There are times you may see us ahead of the fire setting a back burn or pre-wetting off a road or drainage etc., as was used on the Kellogg Fire. The complications that arose during the Kellogg Fire were too much smoke and heat. Our units could not see but a few feet in front of themselves, making it extremely difficult to virtually impossible to use this technique with the winds (as we have all experienced recently) pushing our fires.
The U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and Arizona Department of Forestry & Fire management do not do structure protection. They will try to ring fire around homes if they have ample time. Sonoita-Elgin Fire will protect structures as long as the structures are defensible, and we have the equipment to do so. Wildland trucks carry 300 gallons of water and a 65 gallon per minute pump; a structure engine carries 1000 gallons of water and a 750-1200 gallon per minute pump. It is very hard to protect a structure with a brush truck. And, if we leave the station to suppress a grass fire (taking wildland equipment) and it runs on to structures it’s harder to protect them. So a lot of the time we will back out until the fire passes then we go back in and reassess. Most structures (homes) burn down after the fire passes, outbuildings will burn as the fire front passes – which is why being FireWise pays off. (Most outbuilding do not have doors [embers can get inside] or are not well kept up. Fire gets drawn into a building that has easy avenues for air movement. Tall grasses, weeds, trees and shrubs against structures create pockets of fuel that can be dangerous.)
Sonoita-Elgin Fire District is asking all property owners – homeowners and ranchers – to continue to FireWise their properties – this is not simply protecting your land and structures, it is helping your neighbors. We are a ranching community and these folks make their living with the grassland we all enjoy. The ranchers cooperation is as vital to help prepare their lands around areas were grasslands could be a threat to other structures.

Heroes Wanted

Disaster Preparedness at Your Fingertips

Take the first step toward emergency preparedness by downloading the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) app.

Did you know your smartphone can be an important tool to help you prepare?

Many people use mobile applications (apps) to receive updates on severe weather, help them plan for emergencies, and stay informed of community activities.

The Disaster Information Management Research Center compiled apps from various organizations to help you find appropriate and trustworthy applications including those from FEMA and the American Red Cross. These apps cover the following areas:

  • Family Reunification
  • American Red Cross Suite of Apps
  • Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Hazardous Substances
  • Medical and Health Information
  • Responder Support and Safety including field operations guides
  • Psychological Health Tools for staying emotionally healthy
  • U.S. Federal Agencies
  • Surveillance and Alerts such as disease outbreaks and severe weather warnings

Having preparedness information and planning tools literally at your fingertips is an easy way to take action now!

SONOITA-ELGIN FIRE DISTRICT

3173 AZ-83
Sonoita, AZ 85637
(520) 455-5854
sefd911@sefd911.org

(Click Here for Directions)